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Seaborgium Facts

Seaborgium Facts

Seaborgium is a peculiar element in the periodic table. Read the facts about it in this article and you'll know exactly what I'm talking about. Have fun!
Sujata Iyer
Clifford and Eddie were really bored. Clifford was a chemistry freak and he thought of a way to while away the time. He would tell Eddie about some amazing facts about an element named seaborgium, that he learned just a few days ago. Here's what they spoke about.
Clifford: Have you ever heard of an element existing but not being discovered?
Eddie: What are you talking about?
Clifford: Confused? I thought so. Seaborgium!
Eddie: What??
Clifford: Haha! I knew that would get your attention. I know some awesome facts about seaborgium and its history which I can share with you if you want.
Eddie: Wow! Are you serious? There's really a chemical element by that name?
Clifford: Of course! What do you think, I'm kidding??
Eddie: Ok then, let's hear these interesting facts about this strange element that you claim to know.
Clifford: Oh! I'm sure that by the end of this conversation, you'll know everything about this element.
Eddie: Alright then, bring it on!
Clifford: Ok first, let's get done with the basics. What is seaborgium? Seaborgium is a synthetic element which....
Eddie: Now what is a synthetic element?
Clifford: A synthetic element is that element which does not occur naturally on the earth. Basically, they are man-made elements.
Eddie: But how do they make them?
Clifford: Well, scientists make them in laboratories. They use nuclear energy for radioactivity to do so.
Eddie: So I'm guessing these synthetic elements are unstable?
Clifford: That's right! They are highly unstable. In fact, they cannot remain in contact with anything for more than a few seconds.
Eddie: Yikes! I wouldn't want to go near any of those ones!
Clifford: Oh you can't. The experiments are controlled very well. Ok, now do you want to know some solid facts about seaborgium or not?
Eddie: Oh yes yes! Please tell me.
Clifford: Well let's begin with its history then. Seaborgium was created by two famous institutes, namely, the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley's University of California campus and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research at Dubna in Russia. Both the discoveries were made in 1974. While the one in America was completed in June and led by Albert Ghiorso, the experiment in Russia was successful in September and their leader was Georgy Nikolaevich Flerov.
Eddie: But why is it called seaborgium?
Clifford: Ah! That's an interesting story. The scientists who discovered seaborgium decided to name it after a renowned American scientist, Glenn T. Seaborg, who won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1951. He was also a great nuclear physicist and was responsible for discovering and carrying out extensive research on many transuranic elements.
Eddie: Yes, I've heard about him. But didn't he die in 1999? Then why would they name an element for him before his death. Isn't that unusual?
Clifford: Yes it is, but that's also one of the amazing and amusing about seaborgium. That the great scientists wanted to honor him so greatly that they named it even before he died!
Eddie: Oh! Ok! Enough of the facts. Can you tell me about some properties of seaborgium?
Clifford: Well, seaborgium is classified as a transition metal and it is ductile and malleable, which means it can be drawn into wires and sheets respectively. It can also conduct electricity.
Eddie: And what are its chemical properties?
Clifford: Its chemical symbol is Sg and it is the 106th element in the periodic table. It has 106 protons and electrons, and 157 neutrons in its atom. Its atomic number is 106 and it has an atomic mass unit of 263.0. It has 17 isotopes that are known. They range from 258Sg to 273Sg. Its boiling point and melting point are 2742ºC and 2468ºC respectively.
Eddie: Ok! So tell me, how much does this seaborgium cost and what are is seaborgium used for?
Clifford: You got me there. Since it's been created only a few times and because of its highly unstable nature, you can't really 'purchase' seaborgium. And apart from research purposes, it has no real known uses as such.
Eddie:  Ah! I get it. Wow! Thanks a lot. It was really nice to know so much about such an intriguing element as seaborgium! It has removed any confusion and doubts that I had. I'm amazed at how much the field of chemistry has evolved over the years. It's truly fascinating. Isn't it??
Wow, I'm sure many of you didn't know many of these facts about seaborgium either. Now you do. So share away!