What is the Difference Between Weathering and Erosion?

Difference between weathering and erosion
Though the two terms 'weathering' and 'erosion' refer to different geological processes, they are often considered similar. It is necessary to know the differences between them. Buzzle compares weathering with erosion.
When rock particles loosened by the process of weathering, move or get displaced, it is erosion.
What is Weathering?
It is a process that involves the physical or chemical decomposition or breakdown of rocks, without changing its original position at or near the Earth's surface.

The two main types of weathering include physical weathering and chemical weathering. A biological weathering factor is involved in both these processes.
Physical weathering
Physical Weathering
Physical weathering, also known as mechanical weathering, refers to a process in which there is breakdown of rocks and other matter, without causing any change in their composition.
Chemical weathering
Chemical Weathering
Chemical weathering refers to a process in which there is breakdown of rocks and other matter, with a change in their chemical composition. This change is caused by water and other dissolved substances that chemically react with the rocks or other materials.
What is Erosion?
It is a process that involves the displacement or removal of rocks and sediments from its original position on the earth's surface by the action of water, wind, ice, or gravity. Human activities also tend to accelerate erosion.

The different types of erosion are water erosion, wind erosion, glacier or ice erosion, coastal or sea erosion, soil erosion, and gravity erosion.
Water Erosion
Water Erosion
Water Erosion: It is the process by which materials from the Earth's surface are carried away or removed by the action of water.
Sand dunes
Wind Erosion
Wind Erosion: It refers to the process by which materials from the Earth's surface are carried away or removed by the action of wind.
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Nuptse Glacier
Glacier Erosion
Glacier Erosion: It is the process in which materials from the Earth's surface are carried away or removed by the action of ice or glaciers.
Coastal Erosion
Coastal Erosion
Coastal Erosion: It refers to the wearing away or removal of sediments or materials along the coastline by the action of sea, destructive waves, high winds, etc.
Soil Erosion on field
Soil Erosion
Soil Erosion: It is the process by which soil is carried away or removed by the action of wind or water, or various other agents.
Rock slide
Gravity Erosion
Gravity Erosion: It is a downslope movement of rocks or matter caused by the action of gravitational force.
Weathering Vs. Erosion
Weathering
Erosion
Definition
➦ It is the decomposition or breakdown of rocks or other materials without changing their original position.
➦ It is the displacement or removal of rocks or other sediments from their original position.
Movement
➦ Weathering does not involve any movement of rocks or other materials, and thus, is a static process.
➦ Erosion involves the movement or carrying away of rocks and other materials, and thus, is a dynamic process.
Causes
➦ Weathering is caused by direct contact with the atmospheric conditions such as air, pressure, etc.
➦ Erosion is caused by agents such as water, wind, ice, human activities, etc.
Types
➦ The two main types are physical weathering and chemical weathering. However, there is one more type that is biological weathering which can be a component of both the physical and chemical weathering processes.
➦ Water erosion, wind erosion, ice erosion, soil erosion, coastal erosion, and gravity erosion are the main types of erosion.
Examples
➦ When the root of a plant grows into a crack, it will create pressure on the surrounding rock. Due to the pressure of the growing root, the rock will break apart. This is weathering.

➦ Acid rain can cause the chemical weathering of a statue.
➦ Repeated hitting of waves can lead to breakage of chunks of rocks, further leading to their displacement. This is an example of erosion.

➦ The movement of rocks on slanting surfaces due to gravity is an example of gravitational erosion.
Though weathering is generally followed by erosion, it is important to know that these processes can occur independently as well.