14 Most Deadly and Destructive Typhoons to Hit the Philippines

Gaurav Athavale Mar 20, 2019
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Typhoons are classified as a type of destructive coastal natural disasters, which can affect millions of people living around the coastal regions. The Philippines is located in the Southeast Asian subcontinent, and is the most affected country in the world in terms of typhoons and tropical cyclones.

Nature's Fury

According to available reports, it is believed that the most destructive typhoon to pass the Philippines in recorded history is the 1881 Haiphong typhoon. It struck the Haiphong region, caused over more than three hundred thousand casualties, and affected millions more in that region. Unfortunately, accurate recorded data of this disaster does not exist.
Philippines is a chain of islands located in the tropical zone of Southeast Asia, and frequently experiences high destructive effects of tropical cyclones called 'typhoons'. They are also called bagyo in the local Filipino language. This name was derived from the city of Baguio, which received more than 40 inches of rainfall during a tropical storm in 1911.
Countries located in the tropical belt of our planet are most likely to get affected by storms that arise from marine bodies, and the Philippines is one such nation. Till present, numerous typhoons have caused extensive damage to life and property, ever since researchers started recording and maintaining data related to such natural disasters.
More than ten such high intensity storms reach the surrounding coastal regions a year, but only about half of them reach the interior land or continental portions. In the following sections, the strongest typhoons to hit the Philippines have been listed.

Deadliest and Most Destructive Typhoons to Hit the Philippines

Typhoon Amy

Year of Occurrence: December 1951

Maximum Wind Speed: About 140 mph. (category 4 storm)

Casualties: About 500 dead and 400 missing

Damage: USD 30 million

Typhoon Angela (Rosing)

Year of Occurrence: October 25, 1995

Maximum Wind Speed: 180 mph. (category 5 storm)

Casualties: More than 900 dead

Damage: USD 300 million

Typhoon Bopha (Pablo)

Year of Occurrence: November 25, 2012

Maximum Wind Speed: 175 mph. (category 5 storm)

Casualties: More than 100 dead and 800 missing

Damage: USD 1 billion

Typhoon Durian (Reming)

Year of Occurrence: November 25, 2006

Maximum Wind Speed: 155 mph. (category 4 storm)

Casualties: More than 1,500 dead, many injured

Damage: USD 500 million

Typhoon Fengshen (Frank)

Year of Occurrence: June 17, 2008

Maximum Wind Speed: 125 mph. (category 3 storm)

Casualties: More than 1,300 dead and 80 missing

Damage: USD 480 million

Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda)

Year of Occurrence: November 8, 2013

Maximum Wind Speed: Almost 200 mph. (category 5 storm)

Casualties: About 5,000 dead and 1,000 missing

Damage: USD 2.86 billion

Typhoon Ike (Nitang)

Year of Occurrence: August 26, 1984

Maximum Wind Speed: 145 mph. (category 4 storm)

Casualties: More than 1,400 dead

Damage: USD 1 billion

Typhoon Ketsana (Ondoy)

Year of Occurrence: September 23, 2009

Maximum Wind Speed: 105 mph. (category 2 storm)

Casualties: About 700 dead

Damage: USD 1 billion

Typhoon Megi (Juan)

Year of Occurrence: October 8, 2010

Maximum Wind Speed: 185 mph. (category 5 storm)

Casualties: 69 dead, 4 missing

Damage: USD 700 million

Typhoon Mike (Ruping)

Year of Occurrence: November 12, 1990

Maximum Wind Speed: 175 mph. (category 5 storm)

Casualties: More than 700 dead, many injured

Damage: USD 200 million

Typhoon Parma (Pepeng)

Year of Occurrence: September 27, 2009

Maximum Wind Speed: 155 mph. (category 4 storm)

Casualties: 500 dead, many injured

Damage: USD 600 million

Typhoon Sening (Joan)

Year of Occurrence: October 10, 1970

Maximum Wind Speed: More than 150 mph. (category 5 storm)

Casualties: About 500 dead and 200 missing

Damage: USD 70 million

Typhoon Thelma (Uring)

Year of Occurrence: November 5, 1991

Maximum Wind Speed: 50 - 150 mph. (category 4 storm)

Casualties: More than 5,000 dead

Damage: USD 27 million

Typhoon Undang (Agnes)

Year of Occurrence: October 30, 1984

Maximum Wind Speed: 120 mph. (category 4 storm)

Casualties: Almost 900 dead and 200 missing

Damage: USD 96 million
If at all a typhoon hits inland regions, the damage caused is enormous, in terms of monetary costs, life, and property. Some precautionary measures should always be taken by people living in regions that are affected a lot by such natural disasters.
Avoid being outside when a storm hits land, and take shelter in a basement or any structure which is less likely to be damaged. Stay away from coastal areas, and always keep a reserve of clean drinking water, some food, and a few medicines with you in case of an emergency.
Always pay attention to radio broadcasts and any other form of media that issue warnings before such disasters. After the typhoon passes away, help the concerned authorities to search for the missing people and to admit them to the nearest medical center for treatment.
Keep in mind that chances of an epidemic spreading are high after such a disaster, and hence, take necessary measures. No one can prevent typhoons, but the destruction and damage caused can surely be reduced if proper precautions are undertaken.
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