Amines Vs. Amides - Know the Key Differences

Difference between amines and amides
Amides and amines are organic compounds derived from carboxylic acid and ammonia respectively. We explain to you the definition of and differences between these two organic compounds.
Did You Know?
Although both amides and amines are nitrogen-bearing organic compounds, they vary in their properties (physical and chemical) and structure.
Amides and amines find frequent mention in Chemistry classes. These compounds have physical and chemical properties different from each other. In organic chemistry, an organic compound is a compound which contains carbon molecules. It can occur in either of the three states―solid, liquid, or gaseous. Whereas, every molecule has a group containing atoms or bonds which are responsible for any chemical reaction for that molecule. This is called functional group.

Amine and amide are both abundantly found in nature. They contain the element nitrogen (N) and are also known to have an unpleasant smell. However, most of their physical and chemical properties vary with each other.
Amine Vs. Amide
Amine
✤ Refers to organic compounds and functional groups.

✤ Compounds are derived from ammonia.

✤ Amines are formed when at least one hydrogen atom of ammonia (NH3) is replaced by an aryl or alkyl group.

✤ Amines are more basic than amides.

✤ Nitrogen molecule is connected to at least one alkyl group. Nitrogen atom has a lone pair of electrons.

✤ They are aliphatic.
✤ Amines can be further classified as primary, secondary, and tertiary. In case of primary, one hydrogen from ammonia is replaced by an organic compound. In case of secondary, two hydrogen atoms are replaced by two organic compounds. Whereas, in case of tertiary amines, all the three hydrogen atoms are replaced by organic compounds.
✤ They are represented as R-NH3, or CH3-CH2-CH2-NH3

✤ They are water soluble, and have an unpleasant smell.

✤ Amines are less polar than amides.

✤ They have a boiling point of 49 ºC.
Amide
✤ Refers to organic or non-organic compounds and functional groups.

✤ Compounds are derived from carboxylic acid.

✤ Amides are formed when hydroxyl group of carboxylic acid (C(O)OH) is replaced by compounds such as ammonia (NH3) or amine.

✤ Amides are less basic than amines.

✤ Nitrogen is connected to the carbonyl group. Nitrogen atom has a lone pair of electrons.

✤ They are aliphatic or aromatic.
✤ Amides can be further classified as primary, secondary, and tertiary. In case of primary, nitrogen atom is connected to only one carbon atom. In case of secondary, nitrogen atom is connected to two carbon atoms. Whereas, in case of tertiary amides, nitrogen atom is connected to three carbon atoms.
✤ They are represented as R-NH3, or CH3-CH2-CH2-NH3or CH3CONH3

✤ They are less soluble in water than amines, and have an unpleasant smell.

✤ Amides are more polar than amines.

✤ They have a boiling point of 222 ºC.
Uses
Amine
✤ Amines are used in the production of medicines and drugs, some of which are decongestants and de-allergens.
✤ They are used in making dyes which are widely used in the dyeing industry.
✤ They are used in sweetening process, wherein amines are used in industries to remove gases such as carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide.
Amide
✤ Amides are used in making insect repellant lotions, medicines such as analgesics.
✤ They are used in rubber, plastic, paper, and textile industries.
✤ Acrylamide, an amide, is used to make lotions, soaps, and cosmetic products.
✤ They are used in the manufacturing of insecticides and pesticides.